There is always a way through

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I sat down at my computer this sunny morning in Colorado – where floods have brought such havoc – to write a new post if possible. I’m sorry it has been several days since my last offering. I’ve been busy getting my new book on the “secret promise” of aging ready for publishing.

My target date for publication is October 1. I may or may not be able to meet that deadline. I do find that in this increasingly intense, rapidly changing world, it is helpful to have a goal – and it is also helpful to be flexible in our heart and mind as to exactly how and when that goal is achieved.

It would be nice if life was always a neat, orderly, predictable process but of course it isn’t. It’s more like a wild Colorado river, constantly changing, sometimes peaceful, sometimes whipping itself into a fury.

Even now, as I sit at my desk trying to concentrate on my post, a distraction arises. One of my favorite people, a three-year-old neighbor called Maxwell, is running past my window shouting with joy about something or other, and of course I have to take a moment to watch. What is more important, after all, in this moment, than to stop and enjoy such a picture of delight.

But if life isn’t always comfortable or predictable, if it often resembles a wild, whitewater river, how do we handle the changes that life brings? How do we keep our happiness and sanity while rapids froth and foam all around us?

One of the great gifts of aging, in my experience, is that it offers an opportunity to see more clearly — based in our own past experience — that there is always a way through the challenges that life brings.

We can look back and see with our own eyes how we did in fact resolve or overcome a challenge even though it seemed at the time impossible. We thought the situation was hopeless but somehow we found the wisdom and courage to deal with it.

Putting it another way, aging gives us the opportunity to become more conscious of the true beauty of life and the unlimited potential of our own spirit.

We can savor the magic of “little moments” — like watching a neighbor’s child at play – more deeply. We can become increasingly conscious of the deep pool of stillness and peace at the core of our being that is undisturbed by the tumult of existence.

There will always be challenges. But the genius of our own divine nature is well capable of showing us the way through whatever may befall us and of transforming whatever is transpiring in our world.

I send you best wishes and love and would love to share any thoughts you may like to offer. Be well.

Picture credit: Copyright All rights reserved by Wainwright Warrior

 


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